Doctor guilty in sex case - Coral Springs neurologist refused an earlier plea offer.

Dr. Reginald Phillips of Coral Springs was convicted in March on sexual battery charges and had a chance to plead to separate charges in a second case.

But he refused, and the tactic backfired on him on Thursday when a six-member jury in the second trial convicted him of sexual battery and two counts of battery.

The charges in the second case resulted firm a 74-year-old former patient who said Phillips had anal sex with him, masturbated him and also gave him unnecessary rectal exams during a visit in 1995.

Phillips, formerly a neurologist on staff at the prestigious Cleveland Clicin in Fort Lauderdale, was charged with two counts of sexual battery for the anal sex and the masturbation accusation.

However, the jury returned with a lesser charge of simple battery on the anal sex charge.

Already sentenced to 2 and half years prison for the first conviction, Phillips now may be facing 5 to 9 years in prison.

"This seems like a compromise verdict to me because they dropped the penetration charge," said Bruce Zime who represented Phillips.

"But I think this case is chock full of legal issues that we can appeal. I think these convictions will be indicated."

In addition to the charges from the elderly patient, three other men accused Phillips, 39, in similar alleged in accidents. Each testified at this trail that Pillips, during routine visits to the Cleveland Clinic, either touched them inappropriately or gave them unnecessary rectal exams.

The state charged Phillips only connection with elderly Phillips only connection with the elderly victim and in the case of a 33-year-old Indian town man who came to the clinic seeking help for epilepsy. He said Phillips gave him at least three unnecessary rectal exams the last of which forced him to go to a sexual assault treatment center.

Phillips, who was convicted of those charges on March 13, did not take the stand in his first case, but did in the second trail. Phillips denied the charges, but prosecutor Stacey Honowitz said the men had no reason to make up such stories and subject themselves to a criminal trail. Zimet, on the other hand, said the civil lawsuits filed by three of the men against Phillips and the Cleveland Clinic revealed their true motives.

"Do you think [the elderly victim] turned to his wife after visiting Phillips one day and said 'We're on easy street now?" Honowitz asked jurors during closing arguments. "You think they planned this as a get rich-quick scheme? This violation of trust was the worst experience of the victim's life."

Phillips, who was convicted of those charges on March 13, did not take the stand in his first case, but did in the second trail. Phillips denied the charges, but prosecutor Stacey Honowitz said the men had no reason to make up such stories and subject themselves to a criminal trail. Zimet, on the other hand, said the civil lawsuits filed by three of the men against Phillips and the Cleveland Clinic revealed their true motives.

Phillips, who seemed confident during the trail, clasped his hands in front of him and slowly swayed left to right as the court clerk read the verdict. Friends who attended the trail said they were surprised. Broward Circuit Judge James Cohn is expected to sentence Phillips on Nov.

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